Study reports


To date, Growing Up in New Zealand released three comprehensive descriptive reports with results from our cohort before birth, at nine months and at two years old. We also publish topical reports on policy relevant topics such as vulnerability and residential mobility.

Report 6, Vulnerability Report 2: Transitions in exposure to vulnerability in the first 1000 days of life (July 2015)


Cover of Report 6, Vulnerability Report 2: Transitions in exposure to vulnerability in the first 100 days of life

Transitions in exposure to vulnerability in the first 100 days of life’ is the second report in an evolving series of reports on vulnerability and resilience from growing Up in New Zealand.

The first report described how 12 risk factors that commonly cluster to create vulnerable environments could be used to identify vulnerability early in the New Zealand context.

This second report explores children’s transitions in and out of vulnerable states and describes the impact of persistent and changing vulnerability on children’s health and behavioural development in their first 1000 days of life.

The report also investigates whether there are environments associated with chronic exposure to vulnerability that might be amenable to policy intervention to reduce the impact of early exposure to vulnerability.

Report 6. Growing Up in New Zealand: Vulnerability Report 2: Transitions in exposure to vulnerability in the first 100 days of life (July 2015) PDF | ebook

Report 5, Residential Mobility Report 1: Moving house in the first 1000 days (December 2014)


Cover of Report 6. Growing Up in New Zealand: Vulnerability Report 2: Transitions in exposure to vulnerability in the first 100 days of life (July 2015)

"Residential Mobility Report 1: Moving house in the first 1000 days" describes how often and how far New Zealand children are moving at the start of their lives. It identifies some of the ethnic, demographic, family characteristics and types of housing tenure associated with high levels of mobility.

New Zealand families with children under two have been found to move house much more than previously thought. Whether by choice or necessity, regularly moving house may lead to problems accessing social services like education, benefits and healthcare, and affects families’ support networks and friendships. 

Knowing the extent of families’ residential mobility is vital to ensuring all New Zealand pre-schoolers get the social services they need.

Report 5. Growing Up in New Zealand: Residential Mobility Report 1: Moving house in the first 1000 days (December 2014) PDF | ebook

    

Report 4, Vulnerability Report 1: Exploring the definition of vulnerability for children in their first 1000 days (July 2014)


Cover of Report 4, Vulnerability Report 1: Exploring the Definition of Vulnerability for Children in their First 1000 Days (July 2014)

"Exploring the Definition of Vulnerability for Children in their First 1000 Days" evaluates how commonly New Zealand children experience twelve family and environmental risk factors that have previously been shown to increase the chances that children will have poor developmental outcomes.

These factors are routinely recorded by health professionals in New Zealand during the antenatal period, and include being born to a teenage mother, living in overcrowded accommodation, and having parents who receive an income-tested benefit.

The twelve risk factors have been considered for European populations as a tool to assess early vulnerability in children - however this is the first time they have been evaluated together for their applicability in the New Zealand context using information collected from a the Growing Up in New Zealand cohort of almost 7,000 New Zealand toddlers in their first two years of life.

Our second report in this series describes the changes in exposure to vulnerability over time.

Report 4. Growing Up in New Zealand: Vulnerability Report 1: Exploring the Definition of Vulnerability for Children in their First 1000 Days (July 2014) PDF | ebook

Report 3, Growing Up in New Zealand: Now We Are Two (June 2014)


Cover of Report 3, Growing Up in New Zealand: Now We Are Two (June 2014)

Now We Are Two: Describing our first 1,000 days provides insight into the physical health and development, emotional and behavioural well-being, and cognitive development of New Zealand two-year-olds. The report also depicts changes in the children's home environment, childcare arrangements and socioeconomic situation over the first two years of their lives.

Using information from direct observations of the children and interviews with their mothers and fathers, the report paints a vivid picture of the reality of life for young children and their families in New Zealand today.

Report 3. Growing Up in New Zealand: Now We Are Two (June 2014) PDF | ebook

      

Report 2, Growing Up in New Zealand: Now we are born (March 2012)


Cover of Report 2, Growing Up in New Zealand: Now we are born (March 2012)

Now we are born, released in early 2012 marks the beginning of the longitudinal insights Growing Up in New Zealand is designed to provide.

The report delivers details about the beginning of the children's journeys, in the context of their families and their wider environments. The children are not yet one year old, but already their developmental pathways are being established. We know how critical the first 1000 days of life (from the beginning of pregnancy until two years of age) are for ensuring that all children have a good start in life and therefore can look forward to a healthy future. This report details how our children are doing at the halfway point in this critical developmental period.

Report 2. Growing Up in New Zealand: Now we are born (March 2012) PDF | ebook

Report 1, Growing Up in New Zealand: Before we are born (November 2010)


Cover of Report 1, Growing Up in New Zealand: Before we are born (November 2010)

Before we are born, released in 2010 paints a complex picture of a changing New Zealand. The data generate insights not only into the hopes, dreams and realities faced by soon-to-be-parents, but also into the increasing diversity of our families, and their children, who are very different from those of previous generations, and vastly different from those families involved in earlier longitudinal studies undertaken in New Zealand.

This report also provides what is a first for longitudinal studies worldwide: data from interviews with both parents before the child was born.

Report 1. Growing Up in New Zealand: Before we are born (November 2010) PDF | ebook